Movie Review

Test
  • Story
  • Cinematograpy
  • Acting
3.7

The gang starts telling stories of their eventful college life to the kid, who can speak clearly in the film despite the circumstances, hoping that their story can improve his condition. So we go into flashback and see the actors narrate to Aniruddh and Maya’s son, and us, tales of their lively college life.

The tone of the film is as inconsistent as it can be. In one scene, you will see Sushant sobbing while talking to his son, and in the next, he is planning pranks with his friends in college. The transition is not seamless. Director Nitesh Tiwari aims to have both – past and present – tracks run parallel to each other, but it simply doesn’t work. The sudden change of the background score from melancholic tunes to upbeat music too doesn’t help the audience understand what Nitesh is trying to do with the film.

College dramas like these require strong performances, with the story needing the lead actors help propel the film. But in Chhichhore, Sushant and Shraddha will leave you hanging. It’s the film’s supporting cast, a shoutout to Varun Sharma, that carries the burden of the entire film on their shoulders.

Sushant’s performance as the middle-aged father is nothing less than a caricature. Even when the doctor explains to him his son’s condition, he sits there with a blank expression. He sobs, tries to wipe his tear-less eyes, but just fails to convince the audience that he is heartbroken